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How much are you spending on Data Management?

$850.00

How much are you spending on Data Management?

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – July 2015

Recent surveys of the Information Technology market have suggested an overall increase in expenditure in 2015. What proportion of this increase will be devoted to the area of data management (including data governance, data quality, data warehousing and master data management) in 2015? How do you compare with your peers? Indeed, what are organizations planning for the future in this key area?

In this survey we investigated data management spending in depth. Respondents from some 100 companies and organizations across the world were invited to participate.

The report has 27 pages.

How Reliable is your Data Warehouse?

$850.00

How Reliable is your Data Warehouse?

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – December 2010

Data warehousing has been with us for almost three decades now. More than 25 vendors currently offer a wide range of approaches and software products dedicated to data warehousing. These range from packaged applications to cloud-based solutions and data warehouse appliances. We have recently reviewed this area in our Data Warehouse Landscape 2011.

In the past, many data warehouse implementations gained the reputation of having a high failure rate, often delivering inconsistent data, with the consequence that businesses inevitably lost trust in their reliability. A root cause of this lack of reliability was that little or no attention was paid to ensuring the quality of the data loaded into the warehouse. Has the state of data warehousing in organizations improved over the past two decades?

At The Information Difference, we believe it is important for both organizations and vendors to understand the current state of data warehousing in organizations. We have therefore conducted a survey, sponsored by IBM, aimed at gaining deeper insight into the views of businesses regarding their current data warehousing initiatives.

Some 100 respondents completed the survey from all around the world, the majority (48%) from North America and 35% from Europe. A high proportion (57%) of the respondents were from companies having annual revenues greater than US $ 1 billion; 25% of the respondents were drawn from the banking and financial industries with the remainder covering a wide spectrum of industries.

The report has 32 pages.

Impact of the Financial Crisis on MDM and Data Quality Initiatives

$850.00

Impact of the Financial Crisis on MDM and Data Quality Initiatives

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – Autumn 2008

The recent financial crisis has had widespread impact on both individuals and businesses. It is against this background that a number of comments have appeared in the media urging businesses not to be distracted from their current IT plans but to focus even more on the areas that will bring growth. It seems entirely likely that consulting firms will be faced with delayed or cancelled projects and many software vendors will experience a slowdown in orders. But will most businesses realize that Master Data Management (MDM) and Data Quality (DQ) initiatives hold the key to delivering improved business information and therefore that it makes sense to pursue these initiatives even against the current economic background? In other words, are MDM and DQ immune from the crisis?

There is little hard information concerning the response of businesses to the impact of the financial crisis in this area. At The Information Difference we have conducted a survey, sponsored by Harte-Hanks Trillium Software, aimed at gaining greater insight into the views and plans of businesses regarding their current or planned MDM and DQ initiatives.

The objective of the survey was to explore the views of businesses on the impact of the financial crisis and “credit crunch” on their current and future plans for implementation of MDM and DQ.

92 respondents completed the survey from all around the world, the majority from North America (57%) and Europe (31%). Most of the respondents were from companies having annual revenues greater than US $ 1 billion and represented a wide spectrum of industries.

The key findings from the survey are summarized below.

  • 58% of those surveyed have implemented DQ, MDM or both (32%).
  • Of the remaining 40%, 23% have no plans to implement DQ or MDM in the foreseeable future, 42% plan to implement DQ and MDM in 1-3 years, 11% plan to implement DQ in 1-3 years and 10% plan to implement MDM in 1-3 years.
  • Of those who currently have implementations, an impressive 40% plan to accelerate the implementation, but 37% are undecided as to the best course of action.
  • Overall, of those surveyed, 31% reported that they were uncertain as to how to move forward.
  • Some 9% reported that they planned to delay implementation for a year.
  • On a positive note, only 8% proposed to put their implementations and plans on hold.
  • 50% of those surveyed agreed that in the light of the financial crisis implementation of DQ and MDM should be given higher priority.

These results taken together support the view that we are unlikely to see a major retrenchment in the implementation of DQ and MDM in the business community. We believe this is positive news for both vendors and end users/enterprises alike.

The report has 16 pages.

Is the Data Warehouse Dead?

$850.00

Is the Data Warehouse Dead?

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – January 2015

Big Data has generated much interest and attention in the media of late. Indeed, several authors have recently raised the question of whether Big Data approaches, such as Hadoop, will pronounce the death sentence on the conventional data warehouse.
In this survey we investigate the current state of the data warehouse and examine its recent challenger in the form of Big Data solutions as an alternative. Is the new technology really complementary or is the reign of the data warehouse nearing an end?

The report has 25 pages.

Master Data Management Projects in Practice

$850.00

Master Data Management Projects in Practice

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – December 2009

Master Data Management (MDM) has received growing attention recently as an essential component of information management alongside data governance and data quality. Alongside this growth in interest in master data management, the provision of services for the implementation of master data management is featuring with increasing prominence in the portfolio of services offered by many Systems Integrators (SIs).

While many SIs currently claim or suggest they have extensive implementation expertise in master data management, there is little concrete information available regarding the use of systems integrators by end-user organizations for implementing master data management programs in business. We have therefore conducted a survey of both end-user organizations and systems integrators aimed at gaining deeper insight into the levels of expertise, experience and usage of systems integrators specifically related to undertaking MDM implementations.

Some 131 respondents completed the survey from all around the world, the majority from North America (47%) and Europe (30%). A high proportion (42%) of the respondents came from companies having annual revenues greater than US $ 1 billion. The respondents represented a wide spectrum of industries.

The study throws up some fascinating results, including showing the amount of effort that is needed to maintain MDM systems, how much effort you should budget for to deal with data quality issues, and what are the main lessons from current project practice. The report also shows just how happy companies really are with the systems integrators they use for MDM projects.

The report has 57 pages.

MDM Market Research Survey 2012

$850.00

MDM Market Research Survey 2012

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – July 2012

Master Data Management (MDM) is increasingly becoming a mature technology and successful implementations have been the subject of recent media attention. There is, however, little concrete information reflecting real-world experience. We were interested to better understand the current experience of those enterprises with live MDM programs or plans to deploy MDM, and the challenges that drive interest in MDM. We also wanted to explore to what extent the available MDM technology is meeting the needs of organizations.

We therefore conducted a survey, sponsored by SAP, which was aimed at understanding better the experience of businesses regarding their current MDM initiatives. The survey was particularly focused on “Analytical MDM”, which we define as the provision of authoritative master data for the purposes of enterprise-wide reporting and analysis. “Operational MDM”, by contrast, provides authoritative master data to operational applications such as ERP and CRM systems. The main findings from the survey’s 218 participant answers are detailed in the full report.

The report has 30 pages.

MDM Real-World Experiences

$850.00

MDM Real-World Experiences

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – August 2012

In previous surveys we have charted the adoption and implementation of master data management from its early implementations to the present. Over the past four years, since our first survey in 2008, much has changed in MDM both in technology and in implementation expertise and experience. In particular, MDM has graduated from a novel innovative technology to become relatively mature and accepted. It is increasingly being adopted by multinational organizations as a route to tackling their data inconsistency nightmares and delivering reliable and trusted business information.

This development has been accompanied by a wealth of publications in the media offering advice on how to embark on MDM projects and outlining what their authors believe to be best practices, but how reliable is this advice? It seems to us to be time to ask the real life practitioners of MDM programs to share their views and experiences. So, what is the current position based on the feedback from those who have real-world experience of implementing MDM?

The report has 24 pages.

ROI for Data Management Projects

$850.00

ROI for Data Management Projects

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – July 2011

Companies spend a lot of money on master data, data warehouse and data quality projects, but how successful are these initiatives in monetary terms? There is to date little information available relating to the return on these, often substantial, investments. In this survey, sponsored by Sand and Tibco, we explored how companies justify their expenditures, how they measure success, and how they assess their data management projects in monetary terms.

A total of 101 respondents from organizations across the world completed the survey. One-third (31%) was from North America (including Canada), roughly half (52%) from Europe. Over half (55%) of the respondents were from larger organizations having annual revenues greater than US $1 billion.

The report has 33 pages.

Styles and Architectures for MDM

$850.00

Styles and Architectures for MDM

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – March 2009

Master data management (MDM) has emerged as a key area of information management in the last few years. Initially much of the architectural debate was about whether to be data domain-specific or not, with vendors focused on providing customer or product-specific hubs. In the past couple of years the industry has realised that organisations want a uniform approach to all their master data and vendors have started to address this requirement. There is, however, still a significant divide about the style of implementation, with some vendors specialising in certain areas, and some confusion has arisen around terms such as “operational MDM”, “registry” and “analytic MDM” used for various approaches to implementing MDM. Implementation approaches focus either on managing master data associated with business intelligence and reporting (termed analytic MDM) or managing master data associated with transactional systems (termed operational MDM). There has also been discussion of the use of federated approaches for MDM. 

At The Information Difference we believe it is important for both organizations and vendors to understand how MDM is generally being implemented, so as to gain insight into the underlying reasons for the approaches selected and the available experience to date. We have therefore conducted a survey aimed at gaining deeper insight into the views and plans of businesses regarding their current or planned MDM initiatives, focused on the styles and architectures adopted or planned to be implemented.


Some 188 respondents completed the survey (sponsored by Microsoft™) from all around the world, the majority from North America (59%) and Europe (20%). Most of the respondents were from companies having annual revenues greater than US $ 1 billion and represented a wide spectrum of industries. The responses were split between two groups – those that had already adopted MDM and those planning to do so.

The key findings from the survey are summarized below: • Fully one third of organizations have already adopted MDM and a further 32% plan to do so within three years.
 • There is a high diversity of data domain types in the two groups with an average of five data types being/planned to be managed by MDM. These mostly include, but are not limited to, Product and Customer. Less than 15% in both groups were focused on a single data type.
 • Around two-thirds of organizations had implemented (or planned to implement) using a single hub/database for MDM. Surprisingly a significant portion (20% for those already having MDM and 25% of those planning to implement) had opted for a federated MDM architecture – mostly following their organizational structure (line of business/business unit) rather than geography.
 • Encouragingly, two thirds reported that their current or planned scope was enterprise-wide. 
 • Of those who had already adopted MDM, 23% had adopted analytic MDM, 37% operational MDM and a further 33% both. A similar trend was found for those planning to implement MDM. Over half had implemented analytic MDM, based on the need to improve their management reporting.
 • Reported success rates were high and respondents generally considered their implementations “somewhat successful” (60% for analytic MDM and 63% for operational MDM). Significantly around a quarter of respondents told us their implementations had been “very successful” (26% for analytic MDM and 31% for operational MDM). Less than 6% reported that their implementations had had little or no effect.
 • For around a third of organizations the size of the MDM hub was between 1 and 2 million records. Overall sizes reported ranged from 20,000 to 25 million records.
 • The majority of those already having MDM implementations had elected to use the co-existence model (28%) closely followed by the Consolidation (see page 6 for definition) model (22%). Surprisingly, as many as 17% had chosen the potentially more challenging Transaction model. Among those planning to implement there was no clear preferred option.
 • The average cost of implementation was about US $ 7 million with a median of US $ 3.5 million. The corresponding figures for annual maintenance of the MDM systems were a mean of 8 FTEs (Full Time Equivalents) with median value of 4.5 FTEs.



The report has 30 pages.

The Adoption of MDM by Business Revisited

$850.00

The Adoption of MDM by Business Revisited

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – July 2013

In April 2008, the Information Difference conducted a survey into the take-up and adoption of master data management (MDM) software. Now, in 2013, we revisit this area to understand what has changed over the past five years. In particular we addressed the following:

  • How many companies have implemented MDM?
  • How much effort are organizations investing in it?
  • How successful have they been?
  • What benefits are they seeing?
  • Which tools are being used to help?

A key objective of the study was to understand the extent to which the adoption of MDM has progressed in the past five years since our initial study.

Some 108 respondents from around the world took the survey, 66% from organizations with annual revenues of over $ 1 billion. 54% were from North America and 28% from Europe. A broad spectrum of industry sectors was represented.

The report has 22 pages.