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Machine Learning – Hot or Hype?

$850.00

Machine Learning – Hot or Hype?
A New Research Report from The Information Difference – July 2017
The topic of Machine Learning has received increasing attention from both software vendors and analysts. Indeed, many analysts have suggested that, together with big data, this is the new key focus area for businesses in the near future. This survey is aimed at understanding to what extent this view is reflected across the business community and what real world initiatives are planned or already in place. To address the question “Is Machine Learning really “hot” or just the next hype?”

Some 60 organizations responded to the survey worldwide. 51% were from North America (including Canada), 38% from Europe and the remainder (11%) from the rest of the world.

The report has 21 pages.

Adoption of Data Governance by Business?

$850.00

Adoption of Data Governance by Business?

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – Summer 2008

The mounting pressure on businesses to increase fiscal data compliance, accountability and transparency has compelled businesses to realize and accept that ERP systems and data warehouses alone are insufficient to really tackle the problem of inconsistent, inaccurate and unreliable data. In particular, there is a growing awareness that the processes that create and update corporate data need to be addressed if the data dragon is ever to be slain. This involves understanding, documenting and controlling the business rules that surround the creation of new business classifications (such as a new customer code, a new product line or brand, an updated hierarchy of engineering assets or organizational structure). This is commonly termed “data governance”.

Data governance is the process of establishing and maintaining cooperation between lines of business and management to establish standards for how common business data and metrics will be defined, propagated, owned and enforced throughout the organization. It is closely related to master data management (MDM), which is the management of data that is shared between computer systems, such as customer, product, asset, location or contract.

Although a growing number of organizations have put a tentative toe into the waters of master data management and data governance, there is scant concrete information relating to business motivation, level of maturity and adoption of data governance by business.

Against this background The Information Difference conducted a survey in August-September 2008 into the take-up, adoption and present level of maturity of data governance in business. 233 participants took part in the survey, 60% from companies with over USD $1 billion in revenue. 20% of respondents hold the job title of “Chief Architect” and 16% are CxOs or VPs. 64% were from North America, 20% from Europe and the rest elsewhere. 38% were drawn from the business and the remainder from IT.

The report has 46 pages.

Big Data Revealed

$850.00

Big Data Revealed

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – December 2013

The Information Difference survey, “Big Data Revealed”, was conducted over the Internet during the period October to November 2013. Although Big Data has recently received wide press attention, there is still surprisingly little concrete information available regarding the state of Big Data initiatives in business. We believed the time was ripe to survey this area in depth. In particular, we wanted to put hard numbers around some questions including:

How many companies have actually implemented Big Data technologies, and in what areas?
How much money and effort are organizations investing in it?
Which parts of the business are driving Big Data investments?
What benefits are they seeing?
Which data volumes are being handled?

A total of 178 respondents worldwide took the survey. 34% were from North America (including Canada), 43% from Europe and the remainder (22%) from the rest of the world.

The report has 32 pages.

Data Governance Benchmarking Survey 2010

$850.00

Data Governance Benchmarking Survey 2010

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – November 2010

Data governance is gaining increasing importance and focus in the media, but how effective is it in practice? How does your organization stack up against others? The Information Difference, working together with The Data Governance Institute, has developed a framework for data governance that has been reviewed and vetted by an expert panel of multinational companies with well-established data governance activities. The framework includes the following key areas: Organization, Policies, Risk, Models, Controls, Measurement and Support. This report presents a detailed benchmarking survey into the various aspects of data governance across a wide range of organizations. A customized version of this report can also be purchased [Click here for further details.]

The report was sponsored by Informatica and Teradata.

The report has 56 pages.

Data in the Clouds

$850.00

Data in the Clouds

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – June 2014

Cloud computing has recently received wide press attention, however there is still surprisingly little concrete information available regarding the state of cloud computing initiatives in business. For example, what proportion of companies has implemented cloud implementations, how successful have they been, to what extent are master data management, data quality and data warehousing being deployed in the cloud, what benefits are companies seeing from in cloud deployment and what are the barriers and drawbacks to cloud computing?

In this survey we investigate the adoption of cloud computing in depth.

The report has 30 pages.

Data Quality and MDM – The Missing Link?

$850.00

Data Quality and MDM – The Missing Link?

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – April 2011

Currently, master data management (MDM) and data quality are treated as separate markets, yet any MDM project has a significant data quality component. Many authors have highlighted in the media the crucial importance of data quality initiatives to ensuring the success of MDM implementations. There is, however, little information on the approach being adopted by organizations that have implemented or plan to implement MDM.

It is important for organizations and vendors alike to understand the current state of data quality and master data management in organizations, as well as the degree to which these areas are becoming interdependent. In particular, we explored the link between these important areas to discover how data quality is interleaved into a master data program. We also wished to gain insight into software tools selected and the available experience to date. We have therefore conducted a survey, sponsored by Informatica and Talend, aimed at understanding better the views of businesses regarding their current data quality and MDM initiatives.

Some 192 respondents from across the world completed the survey, which was conducted over the internet. 52% were from North America (including Canada), 36% from Europe and the remainder (12%) from the rest of the world. Almost two-thirds (61%) of the respondents were from larger organizations having annual revenues greater than US $1 billion. The results reflect a good mix of both large and smaller organizations worldwide.

The report has 37 pages.

Does Big Data Mean Big MDM?

$850.00

Does Big Data Mean Big MDM?

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – November 2012

There has been a great deal of recent interest in the industry about how to deal with so-called Big Data, which is defined as follows: “Big Data is the term applied to data sets whose size is beyond the ability of commonly used software tools to capture, manage, and process the data within a tolerable elapsed time. (Source: Wikipedia)”.

Despite this media attention there is scant concrete information on how organizations are addressing the issues underlying Big Data. How does this relate, if at all, to master data management (MDM), and what are organizations doing to consider the impact of the Big Data trend on MDM initiatives? In short, what do organizations believe to be the link between Big Data and MDM? This survey, which was sponsored by Kalido and SAP, aims to answer these questions.

The report has 25 pages.

Growing Adoption of Master Data Management by Business?

$850.00

Growing Adoption of Master Data Management by Business?

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – Spring 2008

Master Data is data that is shared between computer systems, such as customer, product, asset, location or contract. The management of this data is known as master data management (MDM). The mounting pressure on businesses to increase fiscal data compliance, accountability and transparency has driven a growing number of organizations to put a tentative toe into the waters of MDM. This has in part been fuelled by the explosion of publications in this area aimed at convincing businesses that the route to consistent business information lies in effective management of their master data. There is, however, scant concrete information relating to the motivation and adoption of MDM by business.

Against this background, The Information Difference has conducted a survey in April 2008 into the take-up and adoption of master data management (MDM) software. Data was collected for the survey from 112 participants with 65% representing businesses with revenues in excess of USD 1 billion. Some 56% were from North America and 24% from Europe. The purpose of the study was to gain understanding of amongst other factors the level of take up, the business motivation and the preferred approach to implementation.

The report has 20 pages.

How Data Governance Links MDM and Data Quality

$850.00

How Data Governance Links MDM and Data Quality

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – August 2010

Many authors have recently highlighted in the media the crucial importance of data governance and data quality initiatives to ensure the success of MDM implementations. There is, however, scant information on the approaches being adopted by organizations that have implemented or plan to implement MDM, or indeed those who have chosen not to implement data governance.

We were therefore interested to explore the linkage between data governance, master data and data quality. In particular, to discover how organizations are tackling this area in practice. Additionally, we wanted to understand the scale, scope and success rates of data governance in relation to MDM and data quality initiatives in business.

We have conducted a survey to examine the link between data governance, master data management and data quality. A total of 257 respondents from across the world completed the survey. 56% came from North America and 26% from Europe. Fully two thirds of the respondents were from larger organizations having annual revenues greater than US $ 1 billion (62%). The respondents were drawn from a wide spectrum of industries including banking, finance and manufacturing.

A key finding from the survey is that 31% have already implemented data governance and have had active data governance implementations for a median of 2 years. A further 40% plan to implement within one year. Further, a significant number of organizations (39%) are electing to implement data governance alongside MDM (and data quality).

The report has 51 pages.

How Does Your Data Governance Initiative Stack Up?

$850.00

How Does Your Data Governance Initiative Stack Up?

A New Research Report from The Information Difference – May 2016

This Information Difference survey returns to investigate the relationships between data governance, master data management (MDM) and data quality (DQ). In 2010 we conducted an in depth survey on this topic against the background of considerable media focus on the crucial importance of data governance and data quality initiatives to ensure the success of MDM implementations.

Now, six years on, we return to this area in an effort to once again explore and understand what progress has been made over the years. The aim was to find the current state of practice in data governance, the levels of effort involved and its success rate, and understand how well integrated it is with data quality and MDM initiatives. In other words, to address the question “How Does Your Data Governance Initiative Stack Up?”.

The report has 54 pages.